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Download British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment PDF
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Publisher : University of Chicago Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780226302065
Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (263 users)
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Download or read book British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment written by Jan Golinski and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2010-11-15 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Enlightenment inquiries into the weather sought to impose order on a force that had the power to alter human life and social conditions. British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment reveals how a new sense of the national climate emerged in the eighteenth century from the systematic recording of the weather, and how it was deployed in discussions of the health and welfare of the population. Enlightened intellectuals hailed climate’s role in the development of civilization but acknowledged that human existence depended on natural forces that would never submit to rational control. Reading the Enlightenment through the ideas, beliefs, and practices concerning the weather, Jan Golinski aims to reshape our understanding of the movement and its legacy for modern environmental thinking. With its combination of cultural history and the history of science, British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment counters the claim that Enlightenment progress set humans against nature, instead revealing that intellectuals of the age drew characteristically modern conclusions about the inextricability of nature and culture.

Download Enlightenment s Frontier PDF
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Publisher : Yale University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780300163742
Pages : 352 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (1 users)
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Download or read book Enlightenment s Frontier written by Fredrik Albritton Jonsson and published by Yale University Press. This book was released on 2013-06-18 with total page 352 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: DIVEnlightenment’s Frontier is the first book to investigate the environmental roots of the Scottish Enlightenment. What was the place of the natural world in Adam Smith’s famous defense of free trade? Fredrik Albritton Jonsson recovers the forgotten networks of improvers and natural historians that sought to transform the soil, plants, and climate of Scotland in the eighteenth century. The Highlands offered a vast outdoor laboratory for rival liberal and conservative views of nature and society. But when the improvement schemes foundered toward the end of the century, northern Scotland instead became a crucible for anxieties about overpopulation, resource exhaustion, and the physical limits to economic growth. In this way, the rise and fall of the Enlightenment in the Highlands sheds new light on the origins of environmentalism./div

Download Reading Newton in Early Modern Europe PDF
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Publisher : BRILL
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ISBN 10 : 9789004336650
Pages : 368 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (43 users)
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Download or read book Reading Newton in Early Modern Europe written by Elizabethanne A. Boran and published by BRILL. This book was released on 2017-06-15 with total page 368 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Reading Newton in Early Modern Europe investigates how, when, where and why Newton’s Principia was interpreted by readers in Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, England and Ireland. University textbooks and popular simplified vernacular texts created new audiences for early modern science.

Download The Contagious City PDF
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Publisher : Cornell University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780801464003
Pages : 248 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (14 users)
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Download or read book The Contagious City written by Simon Finger and published by Cornell University Press. This book was released on 2012-05-15 with total page 248 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: By the time William Penn was planning the colony that would come to be called Pennsylvania, with Philadelphia at its heart, Europeans on both sides of the ocean had long experience with the hazards of city life, disease the most terrifying among them. Drawing from those experiences, colonists hoped to create new urban forms that combined the commercial advantages of a seaport with the health benefits of the country. The Contagious City details how early Americans struggled to preserve their collective health against both the strange new perils of the colonial environment and the familiar dangers of the traditional city, through a period of profound transformation in both politics and medicine. Philadelphia was the paramount example of this reforming tendency. Tracing the city's history from its founding on the banks of the Delaware River in 1682 to the yellow fever outbreak of 1793, Simon Finger emphasizes the importance of public health and population control in decisions made by the city's planners and leaders. He also shows that key figures in the city's history, including Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Rush, brought their keen interest in science and medicine into the political sphere. Throughout his account, Finger makes clear that medicine and politics were inextricably linked, and that both undergirded the debates over such crucial concerns as the city's location, its urban plan, its immigration policy, and its creation of institutions of public safety. In framing the history of Philadelphia through the imperatives of public health, The Contagious City offers a bold new vision of the urban history of colonial America.

Download Eco Cultural Networks and the British Empire PDF
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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781441108678
Pages : 288 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (411 users)
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Download or read book Eco Cultural Networks and the British Empire written by James Beattie and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2014-12-18 with total page 288 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: 19th-century British imperial expansion dramatically shaped today's globalised world. Imperialism encouraged mass migrations of people, shifting flora, fauna and commodities around the world and led to a series of radical environmental changes never before experienced in history. Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire explores how these networks shaped ecosystems, cultures and societies throughout the British Empire and how they were themselves transformed by local and regional conditions. This multi-authored volume begins with a rigorous theoretical analysis of the categories of 'empire' and 'imperialism'. Its chapters, written by leading scholars in the field, draw methodologically from recent studies in environmental history, post-colonial theory and the history of science. Together, these perspectives provide a comprehensive historical understanding of how the British Empire reshaped the globe during the 19th and 20th centuries. This book will be an important addition to the literature on British imperialism and global ecological change.

Download Shakespeare s Representation of Weather  Climate and Environment PDF
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Publisher : Edinburgh University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781474442541
Pages : 309 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (744 users)
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Download or read book Shakespeare s Representation of Weather Climate and Environment written by Sophie Chiari and published by Edinburgh University Press. This book was released on 2018-11-23 with total page 309 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The first comprehensive history of Byzantine warfare in the tenth century.

Download The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Climate PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781009076913
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (9 users)
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Download or read book The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Climate written by Adeline Johns-Putra and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2022-03-31 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Investigating the relationship between literature and climate, this Companion offers a genealogy of climate representations in literature while showing how literature can help us make sense of climate change. It argues that any discussion of literature and climate cannot help but be shaped by our current - and inescapable - vantage point from an era of climate change, and uncovers a longer literary history of climate that might inform our contemporary climate crisis. Essays explore the conceptualisation of climate in a range of literary and creative modes; they represent a diversity of cultural and historical perspectives, and a wide spectrum of voices and views across the categories of race, gender, and class. Key issues in climate criticism and literary studies are introduced and explained, while new and emerging concepts are discussed and debated in a final section that puts expert analyses in conversation with each other.

Download Weather  Migration and the Scottish Diaspora PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781000203813
Pages : 294 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (2 users)
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Download or read book Weather Migration and the Scottish Diaspora written by Graeme Morton and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2020-10-28 with total page 294 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Why did large numbers of Scots leave a temperate climate to live permanently in parts of the world where greater temperature extreme was the norm? The long nineteenth century was a period consistently cooler than now, and Scotland remains the coldest of the British nations. Nineteenth-century meteorologists turned to environmental determinism to explain the persistence of agricultural shortage and to identify the atmospheric conditions that exacerbated the incidence of death and disease in the towns. In these cases, the logic of emigration and the benefits of an alternative climate were compelling. Emigration agents portrayed their favoured climate in order to pull migrants in their direction. The climate reasons, pressures and incentives that resulted in the movement of people have been neither straightforward nor uniform. There are known structural features that contextualize the migration experience, chief among them being economic and demographic factors. By building on the work of historical climatologists, and the availability of long-run climate data, for the first time the emigration history of Scotland is examined through the lens of the nation’s climate. In significant per capita numbers, the Scots left the cold country behind; yet the ‘homeland’ remained an unbreakable connection for the diaspora.

Download A Cultural History of Climate Change PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781317561446
Pages : 264 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (175 users)
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Download or read book A Cultural History of Climate Change written by Tom Bristow and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-04-20 with total page 264 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Charting innovative directions in the environmental humanities, this book examines the cultural history of climate change under three broad headings: history, writing and politics. Climate change compels us to rethink many of our traditional means of historical understanding, and demands new ways of relating human knowledge, action and representations to the dimensions of geological and evolutionary time. To address these challenges, this book positions our present moment of climatic knowledge within much longer histories of climatic experience. Only in light of these histories, it argues, can we properly understand what climate means today across an array of discursive domains, from politics, literature and law to neighbourly conversation. Its chapters identify turning-points and experiments in the construction of climates and of atmospheres of sensation. They examine how contemporary ecological thought has repoliticised the representation of nature and detail vital aspects of the history and prehistory of our climatic modernity. This ground-breaking text will be of great interest to researchers and postgraduate students in environmental history, environmental governance, history of ideas and science, literature and eco-criticism, political theory, cultural theory, as well as all general readers interested in climate change.

Download Europe and the British Geographical Imagination  1760 1830 PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press, USA
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ISBN 10 : 9780198807117
Pages : 352 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (988 users)
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Download or read book Europe and the British Geographical Imagination 1760 1830 written by Paul Stock and published by Oxford University Press, USA. This book was released on 2019-10 with total page 352 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Europe and the British Geographical Imagination, 1760-1830 explores what literate British people understood by the word 'Europe' in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Was Europe unified by shared religious heritage? Where were the edges of Europe? Was Europe primarily a commercial network or were there common political practices too? Was Britain itself a European country? While intellectual history is concerned predominantly with prominent thinkers, Paul Stock traces the history of ideas in non-elite contexts, offering a detailed analysis of nearly 350 geographical reference works, textbooks, dictionaries, and encyclopaedias, which were widely read by literate Britons of all classes, and can reveal the formative ideas about Europe circulating in Britain: ideas about religion; the natural environment; race and other theories of human difference; the state; borders; the identification of the 'centre' and 'edges' of Europe; commerce and empire; and ideas about the past, progress, and historical change. By showing how these and other questions were discussed in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British culture, Europe and the British Geographical Imagination, 1760-1830 provides a thorough and much-needed historical analysis of Britain's enduringly complex intellectual relationship with Europe.

Download The SAGE Handbook of Geographical Knowledge PDF
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Publisher : SAGE
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ISBN 10 : 9781446209547
Pages : 657 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (462 users)
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Download or read book The SAGE Handbook of Geographical Knowledge written by John A Agnew and published by SAGE. This book was released on 2011-02-17 with total page 657 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A refreshingly innovative approach to charting geographical knowledge. A wide range of authors trace the social construction and contestation of geographical ideas through the sites of their production and their relational geographies of engagement. This creative and comprehensive book offers an extremely valuable tool to professionals and students alike. - Victoria Lawson, University of Washington "A Handbook that recasts geograph′s history in original, thought-provoking ways. Eschewing the usual chronological march through leading figures and big ideas, it looks at geography against the backdrop of the places and institutional contexts where it has been produced, and the social-cum-intellectual currents underlying some of its most important concepts." - Alexander B. Murphy, University of Oregon The SAGE Handbook of Geographical Knowledge is a critical inquiry into how geography as a field of knowledge has been produced, re-produced, and re-imagined. It comprises three sections on geographical orientations, geography′s venues, and critical geographical concepts and controversies. The first provides an overview of the genealogy of "geography". The second highlights the types of spatial settings and locations in which geographical knowledge has been produced. The third focuses on venues of primary importance in the historical geography of geographical thought. Orientations includes chapters on: Geography - the Genealogy of a Term; Geography′s Narratives and Intellectual History Geography′s Venues includes chapters on: Field; Laboratory; Observatory; Archive; Centre of Calculation; Mission Station; Battlefield; Museum; Public Sphere; Subaltern Space; Financial Space; Art Studio; Botanical/Zoological Gardens; Learned Societies Critical concepts and controversies - includes chapters on: Environmental Determinism; Region; Place; Nature and Culture; Development; Conservation; Geopolitics; Landscape; Time; Cycle of Erosion; Time; Gender; Race/Ethnicity; Social Class; Spatial Analysis; Glaciation; Ice Ages; Map; Climate Change; Urban/Rural. Comprehensive without claiming to be encyclopedic, textured and nuanced, this Handbook will be a key resource for all researchers with an interest in the pasts, presents and futures of geography.

Download The Caribbean and the Medical Imagination  1764   1834 PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781108271554
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (82 users)
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Download or read book The Caribbean and the Medical Imagination 1764 1834 written by Emily Senior and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2018-04-26 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Caribbean was known as the 'grave of Europeans'. At the apex of British colonialism in the region between 1764 and 1834, the rapid spread of disease amongst colonist, enslaved and indigenous populations made the Caribbean notorious as one of the deadliest places on earth. Drawing on historical accounts from physicians, surgeons and travellers alongside literary works, Emily Senior traces the cultural impact of such widespread disease and death during the Romantic age of exploration and medical and scientific discovery. Focusing on new fields of knowledge such as dermatology, medical geography and anatomy, Senior shows how literature was crucial to the development and circulation of new medical ideas, and that the Caribbean as the hub of empire played a significant role in the changing disciplines and literary forms associated with the transition to modernity.

Download Weather  Climate  and the Geographical Imagination PDF
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Publisher : University of Pittsburgh Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780822987550
Pages : 376 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (229 users)
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Download or read book Weather Climate and the Geographical Imagination written by Martin Mahony and published by University of Pittsburgh Press. This book was released on 2020-03-24 with total page 376 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: As global temperatures rise under the forcing hand of humanity’s greenhouse gas emissions, new questions are being asked of how societies make sense of their weather, of the cultural values, which are afforded to climate, and of how environmental futures are imagined, feared, predicted, and remade. Weather, Climate, and Geographical Imagination contributes to this conversation by bringing together a range of voices from history of science, historical geography, and environmental history, each speaking to a set of questions about the role of space and place in the production, circulation, reception, and application of knowledges about weather and climate. The volume develops the concept of “geographical imagination” to address the intersecting forces of scientific knowledge, cultural politics, bodily experience, and spatial imaginaries, which shape the history of knowledges about climate.

Download Climate and Culture PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781108422505
Pages : 370 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (84 users)
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Download or read book Climate and Culture written by Giuseppe Feola and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2019-09-30 with total page 370 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Discusses how culture both facilitates and inhibits our ability to address, live with, and make sense of climate change.

Download Tornado God PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780190680305
Pages : 320 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (96 users)
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Download or read book Tornado God written by Peter J. Thuesen and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2020-04-01 with total page 320 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: One of the earliest sources of humanity's religious impulse was severe weather, which ancient peoples attributed to the wrath of storm gods. Enlightenment thinkers derided such beliefs as superstition and predicted they would pass away as humans became more scientifically and theologically sophisticated. But in America, scientific and theological hubris came face-to-face with the tornado, nature's most violent windstorm. Striking the United States more than any other nation, tornadoes have consistently defied scientists' efforts to unlock their secrets. Meteorologists now acknowledge that even the most powerful computers will likely never be able to predict a tornado's precise path. Similarly, tornadoes have repeatedly brought Americans to the outer limits of theology, drawing them into the vortex of such mysteries as how to reconcile suffering with a loving God and whether there is underlying purpose or randomness in the universe. In this groundbreaking history, Peter Thuesen captures the harrowing drama of tornadoes, as clergy, theologians, meteorologists, and ordinary citizens struggle to make sense of these death-dealing tempests. He argues that, in the tornado, Americans experience something that is at once culturally peculiar (the indigenous storm of the national imagination) and religiously primal (the sense of awe before an unpredictable and mysterious power). He also shows that, in an era of climate change, the weather raises the issue of society's complicity in natural disasters. In the whirlwind, Americans confront the question of their own destiny-how much is self-determined and how much is beyond human understanding or control.

Download Weathering Shakespeare PDF
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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781350078079
Pages : 240 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (5 users)
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Download or read book Weathering Shakespeare written by Evelyn O'Malley and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2020-12-24 with total page 240 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From The Pastoral Players' 1884 performance of As You Like It to contemporary site-specific productions activist interventions, there is a rich history of open air performances of Shakespeare's plays beyond their early modern origins. Weathering Shakespeare reveals how new insights from the environmental humanities can transform our understanding of this popular performance practice. Drawing on audience accounts of outdoor productions of those plays most commonly chosen for open air performance – including A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest – the book examines how performers and audiences alike have reacted to unpredictable natural environments.

Download The Palgrave Handbook of Climate History PDF
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Publisher : Springer
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ISBN 10 : 9781137430205
Pages : 656 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (374 users)
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Download or read book The Palgrave Handbook of Climate History written by Sam White and published by Springer. This book was released on 2018-08-10 with total page 656 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This handbook offers the first comprehensive, state-of-the-field guide to past weather and climate and their role in human societies. Bringing together dozens of international specialists from the sciences and humanities, this volume describes the methods, sources, and major findings of historical climate reconstruction and impact research. Its chapters take the reader through each key source of past climate and weather information and each technique of analysis; through each historical period and region of the world; through the major topics of climate and history and core case studies; and finally through the history of climate ideas and science. Using clear, non-technical language, The Palgrave Handbook of Climate History serves as a textbook for students, a reference guide for specialists and an introduction to climate history for scholars and interested readers.