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Download Herodotus   narrator  scientist  historian PDF
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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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ISBN 10 : 9783110583557
Pages : 356 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (15 users)
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Download or read book Herodotus narrator scientist historian written by Ewen Bowie and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2018-03-19 with total page 356 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Recently the importance for Herodotus' work of contemporary medical and sophistic thought and techniques of argument has been widely recognised, as long had been his dependence on and difference from earlier geographical and ethnographic writing. This volume focuses on the place of these interests in his investigatory techniques and sets them alongside his many narrative skills, from superficially traditonal battle narrative and reworking of Greek or non-Greek traditions that border on myth to the structuring of narrative by highlighting the life of objects, and addresses such fundamental issues as how he chooses between competing explanations and how far he valued truth. The book tackles many of the basic issues that confront any attempt to understand Herodotus' work.

Download Herodotus   narrator  scientist  historian PDF
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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Release Date :
ISBN 10 : 9783110582109
Pages : 356 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (15 users)
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Download or read book Herodotus narrator scientist historian written by Ewen Bowie and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2018-03-19 with total page 356 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Recently the importance for Herodotus' work of contemporary medical and sophistic thought and techniques of argument has been widely recognised, as long had been his dependence on and difference from earlier geographical and ethnographic writing. This volume focuses on the place of these interests in his investigatory techniques and sets them alongside his many narrative skills, from superficially traditonal battle narrative and reworking of Greek or non-Greek traditions that border on myth to the structuring of narrative by highlighting the life of objects, and addresses such fundamental issues as how he chooses between competing explanations and how far he valued truth. The book tackles many of the basic issues that confront any attempt to understand Herodotus' work.

Download Ethnicity and Identity in Herodotus PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781351805582
Pages : 342 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (518 users)
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Download or read book Ethnicity and Identity in Herodotus written by Thomas Figueira and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2020-01-16 with total page 342 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Herodotus is the epochal authority who inaugurated the European and Western consciousness of collective identity, whether in an awareness of other societies and of the nature of cultural variation itself or in the fashioning of Greek self-awareness – and necessarily that of later civilizations influenced by the ancient Greeks – which was perpetually in dialogue and tension with other ways of living in groups. In this book, 14 contributors explore ethnicity – the very self-understanding of belonging to a separate body of human beings – and how it evolves and consolidates (or ethnogenesis). This inquiry is focussed through the lens of Herodotus as our earliest master of ethnography, in this instance not only as the stylized portrayal of other societies, but also as an exegesis on how ethnocultural differentiation may affect the lives, and even the very existence, of one’s own people. Ethnicity and Identity in Herodotus is one facet of a project that intends to bring Portuguese and English-speaking scholars of antiquity into closer cooperation. It has united a cross-section of North American classicists with a distinguished cohort of Portuguese and Brazilian experts on Greek literature and history writing in English.

Download Interpreting Herodotus PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780192525529
Pages : 472 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (925 users)
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Download or read book Interpreting Herodotus written by Thomas Harrison and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2018-03-08 with total page 472 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Charles W. Fornara's Herodotus: An Interpretative Essay (Oxford, 1971) was a landmark publication in the study of the great Greek historian. Well-known in particular for its main thesis that the Histories should be read against the background of the Atheno-Peloponnesian Wars during which it was written, its insight and penetrating discussion extend to a range of other issues, from the relative unity of Herodotus' work and the relationship between his ethnographies and historical narrative, to the themes and motifs that criss-cross the Histories and how 'history became moral and Herodotus didactic'. Interpreting Herodotus brings together a team of leading Herodotean scholars to look afresh at the themes of Fornara's seminal Essay in the light of the explosion of scholarship on the Histories in the intervening years, focusing particularly on how we can interpret Herodotus' work in terms of the context in which he wrote. What does it mean to talk of the unity of the Histories, or Herodotus' 'moral' purpose? How can we reconstruct the context in which the Histories were written and published? And in what sense might the Histories constitute a 'warning' for his own, or for subsequent, generations? In developing and interrogating Fornara's influential ideas for a new generation of scholars, the volume not only asserts their enduring value to scholarship, but also offers a wealth of insights and new perspectives on the 'Father of History' that attests to the vibrancy and diversity of contemporary engagement with Herodotus.

Download Herodotus and the Question Why PDF
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Publisher : University of Texas Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781477318348
Pages : 524 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (773 users)
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Download or read book Herodotus and the Question Why written by Christopher Pelling and published by University of Texas Press. This book was released on 2019-07-15 with total page 524 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This study of the ancient historian’s work is “excellent . . . [A] rigorous and engaging introduction not only to Herodotus, but to many other Greek authors” (Times Literary Supplement). In the fifth century BCE, Herodotus wrote the first known Western history to build on the tradition of Homeric storytelling, basing his text on empirical observations and arranging them systematically. Herodotus and the Question Why offers a comprehensive examination of the methods behind the Histories and the challenge of documenting human experiences, from the Persian Wars to cultural traditions. In lively, accessible prose, Christopher Pelling explores such elements as reconstructing the mentalities of storyteller and audience alike; distinctions between the human and the divine; and the evolving concepts of freedom, democracy, and individualism. Pelling traces the similarities between Herodotus’s approach to physical phenomena (Why does the Nile flood?) and to landmark events (Why did Xerxes invade Greece? And why did the Greeks win?), delivering a fascinating look at the explanatory process itself. The cultural forces that shaped Herodotus’s thinking left a lasting legacy for us, making Herodotus and the Question Why especially relevant as we try to record and narrate the stories of our time and to fully understand them.

Download Rethinking Orality II PDF
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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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ISBN 10 : 9783110751963
Pages : 228 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (17 users)
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Download or read book Rethinking Orality II written by Andrea Ercolani and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2022-05-23 with total page 228 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This is the second volume on the mechanisms of oral communication in ancient Greece, focused on epic poetry, a genre with deep roots in orality. Considering the critical debate about orality and its influence on the composition, diffusion and transmission of the archaic epic poems, the survey provides a reconsideration and a reassessment of the traces of orality in the archaic epic poetry, following their adaptation in the synchronic and diachronic changes of the communicative system. Combining the methods of cognitive science, and the historical and literary analysis of the texts, the research explores the complexity of the literary message of the Greek epic poetry, highlighting its position in a system of oral communication. The consideration of structural and formal aspects, i.e. the traces of orality in the narrative architecture, in the epic diction, in the meter and the formulaic system, as well as the vestiges of the mixture of orality and writing, allows to reconstruct a dynamic frame of communicative modalities which influenced and enriched the archaic epic poetry, providing it with expressive potentialities destined to a longlasting permanence in the history of the genre.

Download Reconfiguring the Imperial Past  Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian   s History of the Empire PDF
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Publisher : BRILL
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ISBN 10 : 9789004516922
Pages : 408 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (45 users)
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Download or read book Reconfiguring the Imperial Past Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian s History of the Empire written by Chrysanthos S. Chrysanthou and published by BRILL. This book was released on 2022-05-20 with total page 408 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book argues that Herodian uses an orderly and coherent historiographical form to reconfigure and explicate a most chaotic period of Roman history. Through patterning he offers a distinctive interpretative framework in which successive reigns and individual emperors need to be read in a dovetailed way.

Download Augustus and the destruction of history PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge Philological Society
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ISBN 10 : 9780956838186
Pages : 376 pages
Rating : 4.9/5 (568 users)
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Download or read book Augustus and the destruction of history written by Ingo Gildenhard and published by Cambridge Philological Society. This book was released on 2020-05-15 with total page 376 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Augustus and the Destruction of History explores the intense controversies over the meaning and profile of the past that accompanied the violent transformation of the Roman Republic into the Augustan principate. The ten case studies collected here analyse how different authors and agents (individual and collective) developed specific conceptions of history and articulated them in a wide variety of textual and visual media to position themselves within the emergent (and evolving) new Augustan normal. The chapters consider both hegemonic and subaltern endeavours to reconfigure Roman memoria and pay special attention to power and polemics, chaos, crisis and contingency – not least to challenge some long-standing habits of thought about Augustus and his principate and its representation in historiographical discourse, ancient and modern. Some of the most iconic texts and monuments from ancient Rome receive fresh discussion here, including the Forum Romanum and the Forum of Augustus, Virgil’s Aeneid and the Fasti Capitolini.

Download Early Greek Ethics PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780191076411
Pages : 751 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (91 users)
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Download or read book Early Greek Ethics written by David Conan Wolfsdorf and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2020-09-01 with total page 751 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Early Greek Ethics is devoted to Greek philosophical ethics in its formative period, from the last decades of the sixth century BCE to the beginning of the fourth century BCE. It begins with the inception of Greek philosophical ethics and ends immediately before the composition of Plato's and Aristotle's mature ethical works Republic and Nicomachean Ethics. The ancient contributors include Presocratics such as Heraclitus, Democritus, and figures of the early Pythagorean tradition such as Empedocles and Archytas of Tarentum, who have previously been studied principally for their metaphysical, cosmological, and natural philosophical ideas. Socrates and his lesser known associates such as Antisthenes of Athens and Aristippus of Cyrene also feature, as well as sophists such as Gorgias of Leontini, Antiphon of Athens, and Prodicus of Ceos, and anonymous texts such as the Pythagorean Acusmata, Dissoi Logoi, Anonymus Iamblichi, and On Law and Justice. In addition to chapters on these individuals and texts, the volume explores select fields and topics especially influential to ethical philosophical thought in the formative period and later, such as early Greek medicine, music, friendship, justice and the afterlife, and early Greek ethnography. Consisting of thirty chapters composed by an international team of leading philosophers and classicists, Early Greek Ethics is the first volume in any language devoted to philosophical ethics in the formative period.

Download Faces of Silence in Ancient Greek Literature PDF
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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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ISBN 10 : 9783110695625
Pages : 326 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (16 users)
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Download or read book Faces of Silence in Ancient Greek Literature written by Efi Papadodima and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2020-04-20 with total page 326 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The volume offers new insights into the intricate theme of silence in Greek literature, especially drama. Even though the topic has received respectable attention in recent years, it still lends itself to further inquiry, which embraces silence's very essence and boundaries; its applications and effects in particular texts or genres; and some of its technical features and qualities. The particular topics discussed extend to all these three areas of inquiry, by looking into: silence's possible role in the performance of epic and lyric; its impact on the workings of praise-poetry; its distinct deployments in our five complete ancient novels; Aristophanic, comic and otherwise, silences; the vocabulary of the unspeakable in tragedy; the connections of tragic silence to power, authority, resistance, and motivation; female tragic silences and their transcendence, against the background of male oppression or domination; famous tragic silences as expressions of the ritualized isolation of the individual from both human and divine society. The emerging insights are valuable for the broader interpretation of the relevant texts, as well as for the fuller understanding of central values and practices of the society that created them.

Download Aspects of Orality and Greek Literature in the Roman Empire PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781527546592
Pages : 405 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (275 users)
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Download or read book Aspects of Orality and Greek Literature in the Roman Empire written by Consuelo Ruiz-Montero and published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. This book was released on 2020-02-05 with total page 405 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Orality was the backbone of ancient Greek culture throughout its different periods. This volume will serve to deepen the reader’s knowledge of how Greek texts circulated during the Roman Empire. The studies included here approach the subject from both a literary and a sociocultural point of view, illuminating the interconnections between literary and social practices. Topics considered include epigraphy, the rhetoric of transmitting the texts, language and speech, performance, theatre, narrative representation, material culture, and the interaction of different cultures. Since orality is a widespread phenomenon in the Greek-speaking world of the Roman Empire, this book draws the reader’s attention to under-researched texts and inscriptions.

Download Ancient Greek Comedy PDF
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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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ISBN 10 : 9783110646269
Pages : 371 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (16 users)
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Download or read book Ancient Greek Comedy written by Almut Fries and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2020-06-22 with total page 371 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This volume, in honour of Angus M. Bowie, collects seventeen original essays on Greek comedy. Its contributors treat questions of origin, genre and artistic expression, interpret individual plays from different angles (literary, historical, performative) and cover aspects of reception from antiquity to the 20th century. Topics that have not received much attention so far, such as the prehistory of Doric comedy or music in Old Comedy, receive a prominent place. The essays are arranged in three sections: (1) Genre, (2) Texts and Contexts, (3) Reception. Within each section the chapters are as far as possible arranged in chronological order, according to historical time or to the (putative) dates of the plays under discussion. Thus readers will be able to construe their own diachronic and thematic connections, for example between the portrayal of stock characters in early Doric farce and developed Attic New Comedy or between different forms of comic reception in the fourth century BC. The book is intended for professional scholars, graduate and undergraduate students. Its wide range of subjects and approaches will appeal not only to those working on Greek comedy, but to anyone interested in Greek drama and its afterlife.

Download The Discourse of Kingship in Classical Greece PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9780429557125
Pages : 242 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (295 users)
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Download or read book The Discourse of Kingship in Classical Greece written by Carol Atack and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2019-11-01 with total page 242 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book examines how ancient authors explored ideas of kingship as a political role fundamental to the construction of civic unity, the use of kingship stories to explain the past and present unity of the polis and the distinctive function or status attributed to kings in such accounts. It explores the notion of kingship offered by historians such as Herodotus, as well as dramatists writing for the Athenian stage, paying particular attention to dramatic depictions of the unique capabilities of Theseus in uniting the city in the figure of the ‘democratic king’. It also discusses kingship in Greek philosophy: the Socratics’ identification of an ‘art of kingship’, and Xenophon and Isocrates’ model of ‘virtue monarchy’. In turn, these allow a rereading of explorations of kingship and excellence in Plato’s later political thought, seen as a critique of these models, and also in Aristotle’s account of total kingship or pambasileia, treated here as a counterfactual device developed to explore the epistemic benefits of democracy. This book offers a fascinating insight into the institution of monarchy in classical Greek thought and society, both for those working on Greek philosophy and politics, and also for students of the history of political thought.

Download Kypri  n Politeia  the Political and Administrative Systems of the Classical Cypriot City Kingdoms PDF
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Publisher : BRILL
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ISBN 10 : 9789004520431
Pages : 315 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (45 users)
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Download or read book Kypri n Politeia the Political and Administrative Systems of the Classical Cypriot City Kingdoms written by Beatrice Pestarino and published by BRILL. This book was released on 2022-08-08 with total page 315 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: What kind of society would you face if you travelled to Cyprus in the 5th-4th cent. BC? This is the first book which analyses in detail the politico-administrative system of Classical Cyprus through the study of inscriptions written in different languages.

Download The Province of Achaea in the Second Century CE PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781000540222
Pages : 464 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (5 users)
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Download or read book The Province of Achaea in the Second Century CE written by Anna Kouremenos and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2022-02-25 with total page 464 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Province of Achaea in the 2nd Century CE explores the conception and utilization of the Greek past in the Roman province of Achaea in the 2nd century CE, and the reception of the artistic, cultural, and intellectual outputs of this century in later periods. Achaea, often defined by international scholars as "old Greece", was the only Roman province located entirely within the confines of the Modern Greek state. In many ways, Achaea in the 2nd Century CE witnessed a second Golden Age, one based on collective historical nostalgia under Roman imperial protection and innovation. The papers in this volume are holistic in scope, with special emphasis on Roman imperial relations with the people of Achaea and their conceptualizations of their past. Material culture, monumental and domestic spaces, and artistic representations are discussed, as well as the literary output of individuals like Plutarch, Herodes Atticus, Aelius Aristides, and others. The debate over Roman influence in various Hellenic cities and the significance of collective historical nostalgia also feature in this volume, as does the utilization of Achaea’s past in the Roman present within the wider empire. As this century has produced the highest percentage of archaeological and literary material from the Roman period in the province under consideration, the time is ripe to position it more firmly in the academic discourse of studies of the Roman Empire. The Province of Achaea in the 2nd Century CE will appeal to scholars, students, and other individuals who are interested in the history, archaeology, art, and literature of the Graeco-Roman world and its reception.

Download More than Homer Knew   Studies on Homer and His Ancient Commentators PDF
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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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ISBN 10 : 9783110695823
Pages : 538 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (16 users)
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Download or read book More than Homer Knew Studies on Homer and His Ancient Commentators written by and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2020-04-06 with total page 538 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book contains a collection of twenty-one essays in honour of Professor Franco Montanari by eminent specialists on Homer, ancient Homeric scholarship, and the reception of the Homeric Epics in both ancient and modern times. It covers a wide range of important subjects, including neoanalysis and oral poetry, the Doloneia, the Homeric scholia, the theoretical premises of Aristarchean scholarship, and Homer in Sappho, Pindar, Comedy, Plato, and Hellenistic Poetry. As a whole, the contributions demonstrate the vitality of modern scholarship on Homeric poetry.

Download The Violent Hero PDF
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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781350153738
Pages : 264 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (51 users)
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Download or read book The Violent Hero written by Katherine Lu Hsu and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2020-12-10 with total page 264 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book uses the mythological hero Heracles as a lens for investigating the nature of heroic violence in Archaic and Classical Greek literature, from Homer through to Aristophanes. Heracles was famous for his great victories as much as for his notorious failures. Driving each of these acts is his heroic violence, an ambivalent force that can offer communal protection as well as cause grievous harm. Drawing on evidence from epic, lyric poetry, tragedy, and comedy, this work illuminates the strategies used to justify and deflate the threatening aspects of violence. The mixed results of these strategies also demonstrate how the figure of Heracles inherently – and stubbornly – resists reform. The diverse character of Heracles' violent acts reveals an enduring tension in understanding violence: is violence a negative individual trait, that is to say the manifestation of an internal state of hostility? Or is it one specific means to a preconceived end, rather like an instrument whose employment may or may not be justified? Katherine Lu Hsu explores these evolving attitudes towards individual violence in the ancient Greek world while also shedding light on timeless debates about the nature of violence itself.