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Download Reconstructing Appalachia PDF
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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 10 : 9780813173788
Pages : 392 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)
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Download or read book Reconstructing Appalachia written by Andrew L. Slap and published by University Press of Kentucky. This book was released on 2010-05-28 with total page 392 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Families, communities, and the nation itself were irretrievably altered by the Civil War and the subsequent societal transformations of the nineteenth century. The repercussions of the war incited a broad range of unique problems in Appalachia, including political dynamics, racial prejudices, and the regional economy. Andrew L. Slap's anthology Reconstructing Appalachia reveals life in Appalachia after the ravages of the Civil War, an unexplored area that has left a void in historical literature. Addressing a gap in the chronicles of our nation, this vital collection explores little-known aspects of history with a particular focus on the Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction periods. Acclaimed scholars John C. Inscoe, Gordon B. McKinney, and Ken Fones-Wolf are joined by up-and-comers like Mary Ella Engel, Anne E. Marshall, and Kyle Osborn in a unique volume of essays investigating postwar Appalachia with clarity and precision. Featuring a broad geographic focus, these compelling essays cover postwar events in Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. This approach provides an intimate portrait of Appalachia as a diverse collection of communities where the values of place and family are of crucial importance. Highlighting a wide array of topics including racial reconciliation, tension between former Unionists and Confederates, the evolution of post–Civil War memory, and altered perceptions of race, gender, and economic status, Reconstructing Appalachia is a timely and essential study of a region rich in heritage and tradition.

Download A Tour of Reconstruction PDF
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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 10 : 9780813134246
Pages : 190 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)
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Download or read book A Tour of Reconstruction written by Anna Elizabeth Dickinson and published by University Press of Kentucky. This book was released on 2011-10-01 with total page 190 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Anna Dickinson’s career as an orator began in her teenage years, when she gave her first impassioned speech on women’s rights. By the age of twenty-one, she was spending at least six months per year on the road, delivering lectures on abolitionism, politics, and public affairs, and establishing herself as one of the nation’s first celebrities. In March 1875, Dickinson departed from Washington, D.C., for an extended tour of the South, curious to see how far the region had progressed in the decade after Appomattox. In A Tour of Reconstruction, editor J. Matthew Gallman compiles Dickinson’s commentary and observations to provide an honest depiction of the postwar South from the perspective of an outspoken radical abolitionist. She documents the continuing effects of the Civil War on the places she visited, and true to her inquisitive spirit, questions the societal developments she witnessed, seeking out black and white southerners to discuss issues of the day. Like many northern observers, she focuses on documenting race relations and the state of the southern economy, but she also details the public’s reactions to her appearances, providing some of her most telling commentary. A Tour of Reconstruction, punctuated with a wealth of historical observations and entertaining anecdotes, is the story of one woman’s experiences in the postbellum South.

Download A History of Appalachia PDF
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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 10 : 0813190606
Pages : 324 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (96 users)
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Download or read book A History of Appalachia written by Richard B. Drake and published by University Press of Kentucky. This book was released on 2003-08-01 with total page 324 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "Recent history of the region is marked by the corporate exploitation of oil, gas, and coal resources. Today, radio, television, and the internet provide residents direct links to cultures from all over the world. Touching upon folk traditions, health care, the environment, higher education, the role of blacks and women, and much more, Richard Drake offers a compelling social history of a unique American region."--BOOK JACKET.

Download Southern Communities PDF
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Publisher : University of Georgia Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780820355115
Pages : 295 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (23 users)
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Download or read book Southern Communities written by Steven E. Nash and published by University of Georgia Press. This book was released on 2019 with total page 295 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Community is an evolving and complex concept that historians have applied to localities, counties, and the South as a whole in order to ground larger issues in the day-to-day lives of all segments of society. These social networks sometimes unite and sometimes divide people, they can mirror or transcend political boundaries, and they may exist solely within the cultures of like-minded people. This volume explores the nature of southern communities during the long nineteenth century. The contributors build on the work of scholars who have allowed us to see community not simply as a place but instead as an idea in a constant state of definition and redefinition. They reaffirm that there never has been a singular southern community. As editors Steven E. Nash and Bruce E. Stewart reveal, southerners have constructed an array of communities across the region and beyond. Nor do the contributors idealize these communities. Far from being places of cooperation and harmony, southern communities were often rife with competition and discord. Indeed, conflict has constituted a vital part of southern communal development. Taken together, the essays in this volume remind us how community-focused studies can bring us closer to answering those questions posed to Quentin Compson in Absalom, Absalom!: "Tell [us] about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all."

Download The Ordeal of the Reunion PDF
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Publisher : UNC Press Books
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ISBN 10 : 9781469617589
Pages : 528 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (696 users)
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Download or read book The Ordeal of the Reunion written by Mark Wahlgren Summers and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2014-10-27 with total page 528 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For a generation, scholarship on the Reconstruction era has rightly focused on the struggles of the recently emancipated for a meaningful freedom and defined its success or failure largely in those terms. In The Ordeal of the Reunion, Mark Wahlgren Summers goes beyond this vitally important question, focusing on Reconstruction's need to form an enduring Union without sacrificing the framework of federalism and republican democracy. Assessing the era nationally, Summers emphasizes the variety of conservative strains that confined the scope of change, highlights the war's impact and its aftermath, and brings the West and foreign policy into an integrated narrative. In sum, this book offers a fresh explanation for Reconstruction's demise and a case for its essential successes as well as its great failures. Indeed, this book demonstrates the extent to which the victors' aims in 1865 were met--and at what cost. Summers depicts not just a heroic, tragic moment with equal rights advanced and then betrayed but a time of achievement and consolidation, in which nationhood and emancipation were placed beyond repeal and the groundwork was laid for a stronger, if not better, America to come.

Download The War after the War PDF
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Publisher : University of Georgia Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780820361918
Pages : 192 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (23 users)
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Download or read book The War after the War written by John Patrick Daly and published by University of Georgia Press. This book was released on 2022-06-01 with total page 192 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The War after the War is a lively military history and overview of Reconstruction that illuminates the new war fought immediately after the American Civil War. This Southern Civil War was distinct from the American Civil War and fought between southerners for control of state governments. In the South, African American and white unionists formed a successful biracial coalition that elected state and local officials. White supremacist insurrectionaries battled with these coalitions and won the Southern Civil War, successfully overthrowing democratically elected governments. The repercussions of these political setbacks would be felt for decades to come. With this book John Patrick Daly examines the political and racial battles for power after the Civil War, as white supremacist terror, guerrilla, and paramilitary groups attacked biracial coalitions in their local areas. The Ku Klux Klan was the most infamous of these groups, but ex-Confederate extremists fought democratic change in the region under many guises. The biracial coalition put up a brave fight against these insurrectionary forces, but the federal government offered the biracial forces little help. After dozens of battles and tens of thousands of casualties between 1865 and 1877, the Southern Civil War ended in the complete triumph of extremist insurrection and white supremacy. As the United States marks the 150th anniversary of the Southern Civil War, its lessons are more vital than ever.

Download Black Rights in the Reconstruction Era PDF
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Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
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ISBN 10 : 9780761870364
Pages : 130 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (618 users)
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Download or read book Black Rights in the Reconstruction Era written by Vanessa Holloway and published by Rowman & Littlefield. This book was released on 2018-06-20 with total page 130 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The book systematically goes through the post-Civil War laws; discuss their origins, meanings, and court interpretations; and integrates them into a historical narrative to highlight the legal and constitutional issues involving Reconstruction and the black experience and the problems of federalism, states’ rights, and civil rights.

Download Facing Freedom PDF
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Publisher : University of Virginia Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780813940748
Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (139 users)
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Download or read book Facing Freedom written by Daniel B. Thorp and published by University of Virginia Press. This book was released on 2017-12-28 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The history of African Americans in southern Appalachia after the Civil War has largely escaped the attention of scholars of both African Americans and the region. In Facing Freedom, Daniel Thorp relates the complex experience of an African American community in southern Appalachia as it negotiated a radically new world in the four decades following the Civil War. Drawing on extensive research in private collections as well as local, state, and federal records, Thorp narrates in intimate detail the experiences of black Appalachians as they struggled to establish autonomous families, improve their economic standing, operate black schools within a white-controlled school system, form independent black churches, and exercise expanded—if contested—roles as citizens and members of the body politic. Black out-migration increased markedly near the close of the nineteenth century, but the generation that transitioned from slavery to freedom in Montgomery County established the community institutions that would survive disenfranchisement and Jim Crow. Facing Freedom reveals the stories and strategies of those who pioneered these resilient bulwarks against the rising tide of racism.

Download Praying with One Eye Open PDF
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Publisher : University of Georgia Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780820355252
Pages : 247 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (23 users)
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Download or read book Praying with One Eye Open written by Mary Ella Engel and published by University of Georgia Press. This book was released on 2019 with total page 247 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In 1878, Elder Joseph Standing traveled into the Appalachian mountains of North Georgia, seeking converts for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Sixteen months later, he was dead, murdered by a group of twelve men. The church refused to bury the missionary in Georgia soil; instead, he was laid to rest in Salt Lake City beneath a monument that declared, ?There is no law in Georgia for the Mormons.? Most accounts of this event have linked Standing's murder to the virulent nineteenth-century anti-Mormonism that also took the life of prophet Joseph Smith and to an enduring southern tradition of extralegal violence. In these writings, the stories of the men who took Standing's life are largely ignored, and they are treated as significant only as vigilantes who escaped justice. Historian Mary Ella Engel adopts a different approach, arguing that the mob violence against Standing was a local event, best understood at the local level. Her examination of Standing's murder carefully situates it in the disquiet created by missionaries' successes in the North Georgia community. As Georgia converts typically abandoned the state for Mormon colonies in the West, a disquiet situated within a wider narrative of post-Reconstruction Mormon outmigration to colonies in the West. In this rich context, the murder reveals the complex social relationships that linked North Georgians--families, kin, neighbors, and coreligionists--and illuminates how mob violence attempted to resolve the psychological dissonance and gender anxieties created by Mormon missionaries. In laying bare the bonds linking Georgia converts to the mob, Engel reveals Standing's murder as more than simply mountain lawlessness or religious persecution. Rather, the murder responds to the challenges posed by the separation of converts from their loved ones, especially the separation of women and their dependents from heads of households.

Download Appalachian Travels PDF
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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 10 : 9780813139920
Pages : 318 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)
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Download or read book Appalachian Travels written by Olive Dame Campbell and published by University Press of Kentucky. This book was released on 2012-10-19 with total page 318 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In 1908 and 1909, noted social reformer and "songcatcher" Olive Dame Campbell traveled with her husband, John C. Campbell, through the Southern Highlands region of Appalachia to survey the social and economic conditions in mountain communities. Throughout the journey, Olive kept a detailed diary offering a vivid, entertaining, and personal account of the places the couple visited, the people they met, and the mountain cultures they encountered. Although John C. Campbell's book, The Southern Highlander and His Homeland, is cited by nearly every scholar writing about the region, little has been published about the Campbells themselves and their role in the sociological, educational, and cultural history of Appalachia. In this critical edition, Elizabeth McCutchen Williams makes Olive's diary widely accessible to scholars and students for the first time. Appalachian Travels only offers an invaluable account of mountain society at the turn of the twentieth century.

Download Ginseng Diggers PDF
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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 10 : 9780813183824
Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)
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Download or read book Ginseng Diggers written by Luke Manget and published by University Press of Kentucky. This book was released on 2022-03-08 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The harvesting of wild American ginseng (panax quinquefolium), the gnarled, aromatic herb known for its therapeutic and healing properties, is deeply established in North America and has played an especially vital role in the southern and central Appalachian Mountains. Traded through a trans-Pacific network that connected the region to East Asian markets, ginseng was but one of several medicinal Appalachian plants that entered international webs of exchange. As the production of patent medicines and botanical pharmaceutical products escalated in the mid- to late-nineteenth century, southern Appalachia emerged as the United States' most prolific supplier of many species of medicinal plants. The region achieved this distinction because of its biodiversity and the persistence of certain common rights that guaranteed widespread access to the forested mountainsides, regardless of who owned the land. Following the Civil War, root digging and herb gathering became one of the most important ways landless families and small farmers earned income from the forest commons. This boom influenced class relations, gender roles, forest use, and outside perceptions of Appalachia, and began a widespread renegotiation of common rights that eventually curtailed access to ginseng and other plants. Based on extensive research into the business records of mountain entrepreneurs, country stores, and pharmaceutical companies, Ginseng Diggers: A History of Root and Herb Gathering in Appalachia is the first book to unearth the unique relationship between the Appalachian region and the global trade in medicinal plants. Historian Luke Manget expands our understanding of the gathering commons by exploring how and why Appalachia became the nation's premier purveyor of botanical drugs in the late-nineteenth century and how the trade influenced the way residents of the region interacted with each other and the forests around them.

Download Blood in the Hills PDF
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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 10 : 9780813134277
Pages : 424 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)
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Download or read book Blood in the Hills written by Bruce Stewart and published by University Press of Kentucky. This book was released on 2012-01-01 with total page 424 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: To many antebellum Americans, Appalachia was a frightening wilderness of lawlessness, peril, robbers, and hidden dangers. The extensive media coverage of horse stealing and scalping raids profiled the regionÕs residents as intrinsically violent. After the Civil War, this characterization continued to permeate perceptions of the area and news of the conflict between the Hatfields and the McCoys, as well as the bloodshed associated with the coal labor strikes, cemented AppalachiaÕs violent reputation. Blood in the Hills: A History of Violence in Appalachia provides an in-depth historical analysis of hostility in the region from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century. Editor Bruce E. Stewart discusses aspects of the Appalachian violence culture, examining skirmishes with the native population, conflicts resulting from the regionÕs rapid modernization, and violence as a function of social control. The contributors also address geographical isolation and ethnicity, kinship, gender, class, and race with the purpose of shedding light on an often-stereotyped regional past. Blood in the Hills does not attempt to apologize for the region but uses detailed research and analysis to explain it, delving into the social and political factors that have defined Appalachia throughout its violent history.

Download Rebels against the Confederacy PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781316062654
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (16 users)
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Download or read book Rebels against the Confederacy written by Barton A. Myers and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2014-10-13 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In this groundbreaking study, Barton A. Myers analyzes the secret world of hundreds of white and black Southern Unionists as they struggled for survival in a new Confederate world, resisted the imposition of Confederate military and civil authority, began a diffuse underground movement to destroy the Confederacy, joined the United States Army as soldiers, and waged a series of violent guerrilla battles at the local level against other Southerners. Myers also details the work of Confederates as they struggled to build a new nation at the local level and maintain control over manpower, labor, agricultural, and financial resources, which Southern Unionists possessed. The story is not solely one of triumph over adversity but also one of persecution and, ultimately, erasure of these dissidents by the postwar South's Lost Cause mythologizers.

Download Cultivating Race PDF
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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 10 : 9780813134260
Pages : 442 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)
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Download or read book Cultivating Race written by Watson W. Jennison and published by University Press of Kentucky. This book was released on 2012-01-01 with total page 442 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From the eighteenth century to the eve of the Civil War, Georgia's racial order shifted from the somewhat fluid conception of race prevalent in the colonial era to the harsher understanding of racial difference prevalent in the antebellum era. In Cultivating Race: The Expansion of Slavery in Georgia, 1750--1860, Watson W. Jennison explores the centrality of race in the development of Georgia, arguing that long-term structural and demographic changes account for this transformation. Jennison traces the rise of rice cultivation and the plantation complex in low country Georgia in the mid-eighteenth century and charts the spread of slavery into the up country in the decades that followed. Cultivating Race examines the "cultivation" of race on two levels: race as a concept and reality that was created, and race as a distinct social order that emerged because of the specifics of crop cultivation. Using a variety of primary documents including newspapers, diaries, correspondence, and plantation records, Jennison offers an in-depth examination of the evolution of racism and racial ideology in the lower South.

Download Family or Freedom PDF
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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 10 : 9780813136936
Pages : 244 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)
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Download or read book Family or Freedom written by Emily West and published by University Press of Kentucky. This book was released on 2012-11-01 with total page 244 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In the antebellum South, the presence of free people of color was problematic to the white population. Not only were they possible assistants to enslaved people and potential members of the labor force; their very existence undermined popular justifications for slavery. It is no surprise that, by the end of the Civil War, nine Southern states had enacted legal provisions for the "voluntary" enslavement of free blacks. What is surprising to modern sensibilities and perplexing to scholars is that some individuals did petition to rescind their freedom. Family or Freedom investigates the incentives for free African Americans living in the antebellum South to sacrifice their liberty for a life in bondage. Author Emily West looks at the many factors influencing these dire decisions -- from desperate poverty to the threat of expulsion -- and demonstrates that the desire for family unity was the most important consideration for African Americans who submitted to voluntary enslavement. The first study of its kind to examine the phenomenon throughout the South, this meticulously researched volume offers the most thorough exploration of this complex issue to date.

Download Beyond Freedom PDF
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Publisher : University of Georgia Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780820351476
Pages : 208 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (23 users)
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Download or read book Beyond Freedom written by David W. Blight and published by University of Georgia Press. This book was released on 2017-11-01 with total page 208 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This collection of eleven original essays interrogates the concept of freedom and recenters our understanding of the process of emancipation. Who defined freedom, and what did freedom mean to nineteenth-century African Americans, both during and after slavery? Did freedom just mean the absence of constraint and a widening of personal choice, or did it extend to the ballot box, to education, to equality of opportunity? In examining such questions, rather than defining every aspect of postemancipation life as a new form of freedom, these essays develop the work of scholars who are looking at how belonging to an empowered government or community defines the outcome of emancipation. Some essays in this collection disrupt the traditional story and time-frame of emancipation. Others offer trenchant renderings of emancipation, with new interpretations of the language and politics of democracy. Still others sidestep academic conventions to speak personally about the politics of emancipation historiography, reconsidering how historians have used source material for understanding subjects such as violence and the suffering of refugee women and children. Together the essays show that the question of freedom—its contested meanings, its social relations, and its beneficiaries—remains central to understanding the complex historical process known as emancipation. Contributors: Justin Behrend, Gregory P. Downs, Jim Downs, Carole Emberton, Eric Foner, Thavolia Glymph, Chandra Manning, Kate Masur, Richard Newman, James Oakes, Susan O’Donovan, Hannah Rosen, Brenda E. Stevenson.

Download A History of the Ozarks  Volume 2 PDF
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Publisher : University of Illinois Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780252051593
Pages : 344 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (52 users)
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Download or read book A History of the Ozarks Volume 2 written by Brooks Blevins and published by University of Illinois Press. This book was released on 2019-09-30 with total page 344 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Ozarks of the mid-1800s was a land of divisions. The uplands and its people inhabited a geographic and cultural borderland straddling Midwest and west, North and South, frontier and civilization, and secessionist and Unionist. As civil war raged across the region, neighbor turned against neighbor, unleashing a generation of animus and violence that lasted long after 1865.The second volume of Brooks Blevins's history begins with the region's distinctive relationship to slavery. Largely unsuitable for plantation farming, the Ozarks used enslaved persons on a smaller scale or, in some places, not at all. Blevins moves on to the devastating Civil War years where the dehumanizing, personal nature of Ozark conflict was made uglier by the predations of marching armies and criminal gangs. Blending personal stories with a wide narrative scope, he examines how civilians and soldiers alike experienced the war, from brutal partisan warfare to ill-advised refugee policies to women's struggles to safeguard farms and stay alive in an atmosphere of constant danger. The war stunted the region's growth, delaying the development of Ozarks society and the processes of physical, economic, and social reconstruction. More and more, striving uplanders dedicated to modernization fought an image of the Ozarks as a land of mountaineers and hillbillies hostile to the idea of progress. Yet the dawn of the twentieth century saw the uplands emerge as an increasingly uniform culture forged, for better and worse, in the tumult of a conflicted era.